Illustration of the visual cortex during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In this non-invasive brain stimulation technique pulses of current (arrows) are passed through a figure-eight shaped coil placed above the scalp. The induced electric f ...

Illustration of the visual cortex during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In this non-invasive brain stimulation technique, pulses of current (arrows) are passed through a figure-eight shaped coil placed above the scalp. The induced electric field elicits long-lasting alterations in neural activity which can be measured with blood flow-based imaging methods. (Elena Allen/UC Berkeley)

Neuroscientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have for the first time measured the electrical activity of nerve cells and correlated it to changes in blood flow in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a noninvasive method to stimulate neurons in the brain.

Read Complete Article Here : Physorg

Advertisements