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Project Cerebro

This category is only for understanding
How the human brain functions and why the human is so intelligent than any other living form.

In short “Project Cerebro”

Neuronal activity gives clues to working memory

A newly discovered interplay of cells in one of the brain’s memory centers sheds light on how you recall your grocery list, where you laid your keys, and a host of important but fleeting daily tasks.


Scientists at Weill Cornell Medical College say their experiments with common goldfish are uncovering the secrets of a form of short-term recall known as “working memory.”

“We’ve now identified a mechanism that can organize the activity of groups of cells involved in this important form of recall,” says lead researcher Dr. Emre Aksay, assistant professor of computational neuroscience in the HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud Institute for Computational Biomedicine at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City.

Read Complete Article Here : Physorg

How brain fills gaps

A vase from Chinaacutes Song dynasty demonstrates the use of very faint contrast borders to create the illusion of shading on a one-color background. The phenomenon is known as edge induction. The image of the vase is overlaid over the Cornsweet illu ...

 

A vase from China’s Song dynasty demonstrates the use of very faint contrast borders to create the illusion of shading on a one-color background. The phenomenon is known as edge induction. The image of the vase is overlaid over the Cornsweet illusion, in which the left half of a rectangle divided in two looks lighter and the right area darker. Holding one’s hand over the center of the image reveals that the left and the right are in fact the same color. The brain “fills in” the color on the left and the right in response to information from the middle border. Courtesy of Anna Roe.

When in doubt about what we see, our brains fill in the gaps for us by first drawing the borders and then “coloring” in the surface area, new research has found. The research is the first to pinpoint the areas in the brain, and the timing of their activity, that are responsible for how we see borders and surfaces.

Read Complete Story Here : Physorg

Neuroscientists connect neural activity and blood flow in new brain stimulation technique

Illustration of the visual cortex during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In this non-invasive brain stimulation technique pulses of current (arrows) are passed through a figure-eight shaped coil placed above the scalp. The induced electric f ...

Illustration of the visual cortex during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In this non-invasive brain stimulation technique, pulses of current (arrows) are passed through a figure-eight shaped coil placed above the scalp. The induced electric field elicits long-lasting alterations in neural activity which can be measured with blood flow-based imaging methods. (Elena Allen/UC Berkeley)

Neuroscientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have for the first time measured the electrical activity of nerve cells and correlated it to changes in blood flow in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a noninvasive method to stimulate neurons in the brain.

Read Complete Article Here : Physorg

How Does the Brain Recognize a Face?

The smile of the Mona Lisa may remain forever ineffable, but at least now science can measure the difference between the real thing and its many imitations.

A team of neuroscientists including Irving Biederman, the holder of the Harold Dornsife Chair in Neurosciences in USC College, say they can predict with near-perfect accuracy whether two faces resemble each other enough to fool a human observer.

The study used a face recognition computer model, previously developed by Christoph von der Malsburg of the USC Viterbi School of Engineering and the College, to try to understand how human brains recognize faces.

Read Complete Story Here : Physorg

Researchers can read thoughts to decipher what a person is actually seeing

Following ground-breaking research showing that neurons in the human brain respond in an abstract manner to particular individuals or objects, University of Leicester researchers have now discovered that, from the firing of this type of neuron, they can tell what a person is actually seeing.

The original research by Dr R Quian Quiroga, of the University’s Department of Engineering, showed that one neuron fired to, for instance, Jennifer Aniston, another one to Halle Berry, another one to the Sydney Opera House, etc.

Read Complete Article Here : Physorg

Part Of Human Brain Functions Like A Digital Computer

A region of the human brain that scientists believe is critical to human intellectual abilities surprisingly functions much like a digital computer, according to psychology Professor Randall O’Reilly of the University of Colorado at Boulder.

The finding could help researchers better understand the functioning of human intelligence.

In a review of biological computer models of the brain appearing in the Oct. 6 edition of the journal Science, O’Reilly contends that the prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia operate much like a digital computer system.

“Many researchers who create these models shun the computer metaphor,” O’Reilly said. “My work comes out of a tradition that says people’s brains are nothing like computers, and now all of a sudden as we look at them, in fact, in a certain respect they are like computers.”

Digital computers operate by turning electrical signals into binary “on and off states” and flexibly manipulating these states by using switches. O’Reilly found the same operating principles in the brain.

Read Complete Story Here : Physorg

NOTE: Project Cerebro is my small effort to understand the human brain , your valuable  comments might really help me , will be adding anything interesting i come across here in this section.

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